Bow Tie

Bow ties have been all the rage the past few years, even withstanding the mustache obsession (which I’ve never understood), especially when it comes to babies! This quilt block would be very adorable done in many colors if you know of a little boy on the way.

I put four bow ties together in one block as a part of Old Glory. (Finished project here.)

bow tie quilt block tutorial

Here’s the how-to for the Bow Tie Quilt Block:

Note: These measurements are for a 4″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 1 rectangle 4 1/2″ x 1 7/8″ red
  • 2 squares 2 1/2″ red
  • 2 squares 2 1/2″ white
  • 2 squares 1 7/8″ white

Use the 2 squares of 2 1/2″ red and white to create 4 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 1 7/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the Bow Tie Quilt Block:

bow tie quilt block tutorial | sew you think you can cook

Sew the HSTs to the white squares:

bow tie quilt block tutorial | sew you think you can cook

Sew the bow tie “flaps” on to the red rectangle:

Bow Tie Quilt Block Tutorial | Sew You Think You Can Cook

School Girl’s Puzzle

Just because I revealed the final version of Old Glory that doesn’t mean I’m done with quilt block tutorials! Today’s block is called the School Girl’s Puzzle. This block isn’t in my quilt, but it is (or will be) in my mother-in-law’s version, which she’s named “Older Glory”. Her version of this American Flag sampler quilt is a scrappy sampler – meaning each of her blocks uses a different fabric. I can’t wait to see how hers turns out. I wasn’t brave enough to mix hundreds of fabrics so I used only 3 different reds and 2 different blues.

School Girl's Puzzle quilt block tutorial

Here is the how-to for the School Girl’s Puzzle Quilt Block:

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 4 squares 2 1/2″ white
  • 3 squares 3 1/8″ red
  • 3 squares 3 1/8″ white
  • 2 squares 2 7/8″ white, then cut on the diagonal
  • 1 square 4 7/8″ red, then cut on the diagonal

Use the 3 squares of 3 1/8″ red and white to create 6 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 2 1/2″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the School Girl’s Puzzle quilt block:

School Girl's Puzzle quilt block tutorial

Looking at the top left quadrant, sew a white triangle to the HST:

School Girl's Puzzle quilt block tutorial

Then sew the other white triangle to the HST:

School Girl's Puzzle quilt block tutorial

Sew the new triangle to the red triangle. Repeat with the bottom right quadrant.

The remaining two quadrants are four patches, sew accordingly.

You now have a four patch ready to assemble:

School Girl's Puzzle quilt block tutorial | Sew You Think You Can Cook

Old Glory – completed!

Last year I shared the plans for the Fourth of July quilt that was already underway.

Over two years later, my goal of completing this quilt by the Fourth did indeed happen.

American Flag Sampler Quilt | Sew You Think You Can Cook

In February of this year (2015) Old Glory was finally completed and ready to be taken to the quilters! On June 16th I got a call that Old Glory was ready for pick up (three days before I was expecting it) and on the 20th I had finally gotten the binding sewn on.

Getting the binding on the quilt ended up being a challenge as I was one strip short of having enough fabric to go all the way around the quilt. I had to do some finagling but I got it to work. Instead of sewing the binding strips on a bias to reduce bulk I simply sewed straight lines at a 1/4″ seam allowance. The last strip of “just too skiny” fabric was cut in half, sewn together lengthwise, and trimmed to 2 1/4″ before being attached to the long strip of binding. I am relieved to say that even knowing where the “awkward” location on the binding is, I struggle to find it. Phew!

All that’s left to do is create the tag for Old Glory and sew it on. But for this year, it’s as good as ready for our first family of three firework watching. (Here’s to hoping my now one-year-old enjoys the bright flashes of light and loud bangs…)

American Flag Sampler Quilt (details) | Sew You Think You Can Cook

I wish you all a safe and happy Fourth of July.

And God Bless America.

American Flag Sampler Quilt (front + back) | Sew You Think You Can Cook

Box-in-a-Box Variation

It’s July again and now that I’ve completed Old Glory, my patriotic sampler quilt, I am going to blog a few more quilt block tutorials this month.

This quilt block is a box-in-a-box variation, colored out so that it looks like a mini spool or hourglass.

My mother-in-law and I spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out if it were possible to paper piece this block. At least the way I’ve colored it, the answer was no. Instead we broke it down into squares, rectangles, and half square triangles (HSTs).

(I apologize for the photo below, evidently I didn’t take a photo of the finished block. This photo will be updated with a better photo as soon as I can!)

box-in-a-box

Here is the how-to for a Box-in-a-Box Variation quilt block:

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. 

Cut fabric:

  • 1 square 3 1/8″ red
  • 2 rectangles 3 1/8″ x 1 7/8″ red
  • 2 rectangles 3 1/8″ x 1 7/8″ white
  • 2 squares 3″ red
  • 2 squares 3″ white
  • 2 rectangles 5 7/8″ x 1 7/8″ red
  • 2 rectangles 5 7/8″ x 1 7/8″ white

Use the 4 squares of 3″ red and white to create 4 HSTs trimmed down to 1 7/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the HSTs and other pieces of fabric into the box-in-a-box variation quilt block:

box-in-a-box quilt block tutorial

The center spool (or hourglass) is a 9-patch. Sew that 9-patch together:

box-in-a-box quilt block tutorial 2

The remaining patches form another 9-patch. Sew the 9-patch together. You now have a box-in-a-box variation.

DIY Design Board

Today I am going to show you how you can make your very own design board. This simple DIY only takes minutes to do and is very cost effective. Sure, you could use a cork board, but finding one large enough for quilting can cost as much as $20 per square foot!

In Florida my mother-in-law created a temporary design board for me by simply hanging some flannel on the wall. She sewed some lightweight plastic rings at the top of the fabric and hung them on the wall. This design board worked great! But the version I have now is more multi-purpose-friendly and still temporary. I can now stick pins into it, allowing me to pin up papers or even piles of fabric squares. (The blocks below are part of Old Glory, or will be if I ever finish it!)

IMG_1563

DIY design boardHere’s what you need:

  • Foam board insulation, cut to desired wall size
  • Flannel fabric, cut to foam board size plus 3″ overhang on all four sides (remember, you’ll want a neutral color so it won’t clash with your projects)
  • Stapler*
  • Duct tape*
  • Command strips (optional)

*If you have a staple gun you won’t need the duct tape

Here’s what you do:

  1. Lay your flannel on a flat surface and place your foam board insulation in the center of it, words up.
  2. Tightly fold the flannel around the board and staple in place. Reinforce with duct tape.
  3. To hang on the wall use command strips for a temporary design board, or nail in place.

DIY design board

8-Grid Chain Variation

There are many variations of the 8-Grid Chain Quilt Block. Simply google it! There are endless possibilities with using different fabrics too. This is the variation I used in my Fourth of July quilt  Old Glory.

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

Here’s the how-to for this 8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block

Cut fabric:

  • 12 squares 1 1/2″ red
  • 8 squares 1 1/2″ white
  • 4 rectangles 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ white
  • 4 rectangles 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ white
  • 1 square 2 1/2″ red

Lay out fabric squares into the 8-Grid Chain Variation:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

 

Sew together the four 4-patch blocks in the corner. Also, sew together the 9-patch block in the center:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

The 8-Grid Chain Variation is now a simple 9-patch. Complete the three rows before sewing the rows together:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

Grecian Square

I used the Grecian Square quilt block before. It is also known as the Monkey Wrench. I used it in the quilt I made in honor of my grandmother. But this tutorial will look a little different. Simply reversing the neutral and color creates a very different look.

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

Here is the how-to for the Grecian Square Quilt Block:

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 2 squares 3 7/8″ red
  • 2 squares 3 7/8″ white
  • 4 rectangles 1 7/8″ x 3 1/8″ red
  • 4 rectangles 1 7/8″ x 3 1/8″ white
  • 1 square 3 1/8″ red

Use the 2 squares of 3 7/8″ red and white to create 4 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 3 1/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the Grecian Square Quilt Block:

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew the red and white rectangles together:

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

Now the Grecian Square is simply a 9-patch.